Jan
06
2012

An Enthusiast’s guide to cocktails: the Sazerac

–Christian

Sazerac Bar—Roosevelt Hotel, New Orleans

The Sazerac is one of the oldest cocktails still commonly consumed today. Invented around 1830 in New Orleans (where all the classics seem to have come from) by a Creole apothecary from the West Indies named Antoine Amadie Peychaud, the drink’s original recipe called for cognac, bitters, sugar and a dash of water. Incidentally, this concoction was pretty much the only cocktail recipe back in those days—something now referred to as the Old Fashioned.

Antoine’s particular approach and proprietary bitters were so popular that bars (or “Exchanges”) all over NOLA started serving it. Legend has it that a man named Sewell Taylor, owner of Merchants Exchange Coffeehouse, was serving the drink at his bar when he became the sole importer of Sazerac-du-Forge et fils Cognac. Shortly thereafter Aaron Bird took over the Merchant’s Exchange from Taylor, who had gone full-time into importing, and changed the name to Sazerac House after the liquor in their signature drink. And the first branded cocktail was born.
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Aug
12
2011

How to make the Summer Tremble

Our first happy hour event was a great success. After setting up at HANGR 16, I mixed drinks like crazy for almost three hours.
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Feb
10
2011

Mixology 101

—Josey

When we saw the name of the class—“Mixology for the Alcohol Enthusiast”—we knew Jeebus herself wanted us to sign up. But admittedly, when we left the unseasonably sunny February afternoon behind and wandered into club Mist, a little worse for wear from Friday happy 12-hours, we were shocked to find other students that were not just us crowded around the bar. Then we realized where we’d mis-assumed—of course!—these drunks had named their blogs the Alcohol Enthusiast, too. Duh. Duh. We’re so dumb.

Once the initial surprise wore off, and we sent enough knowing and not-at-all-creepy winks around the bar at our classmates, it was time to start mixologying, 101-style.

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